In Memoriam

 

Housestaff

The obituaries below are listed chronologically by years of service as MHMH or Dartmouth-Hitchcock housestaff. To go directly to any individual obituary, click on the name here, listed in alphabetical order.

Michael G. Altmann, HS 1978-1982
Leo F. Amrhein, Jr., HS 1974-1975
Roger E. Anderson, HS 1953
Bryant Barnard, HS 1969
John J. Barrett, HS 1970-1972
Robert B. Bokat, HS 1965-1967
Armand L. Bonvouloir, Jr., HS 1956-1961
Gerald E. Bowen, HS 1960-1963
Jane B. Cadbury, HS 1946-1947
Dennis J. Carlson, HS 1960-1964
Kenneth N. Carpenter, HS 1964-1965
Charles B. Carter, HS 1960-1961
Kent W. Christoferson, HS 1951
Kenneth E. Cosgrove, HS 1950-1951, 1952-1953
George E. Crickard, Jr., HS 1954-1957
James C. Dangel, HS 1965-1967
Steven C. Delheimer, HS 1975-1976
Donald J. Dowler, HS 1965-1967
Richard L. Field, HS 1959-1960
Frederick Fries, HS 1983-1986
James A. Frizzell, HS 1969-1974
Dana John Giulian, HS 1978-1979
Harold H. Hoefle, HS 1959-1961
Brent A. Homoleski, HS 2003-2007
Lon W. Howard, HS 1982-1984
Mark J. Iannini, HS 1979-1981
Robert C. Joy, DMS '49, HS 1951-1953
Gudbjorn Karlsson, HS 1999-2002
Daniel F. Klinar, HS 1985-1987
Allen R. Koenig, HS 1959-1961
Owen P. Lamerson, HS 1953-1957
Kenneth A. LaTourette, HS 1949-1952
Frank J. Lepreau, Jr., HS 1938-1940
Richard A. McManus, HS 1956-1957
Virginia Moister, HS 1956-1960
Ralph W. Muckley, Jr., HS 1948-1951
James J. O’Connor, HS 1975-1979
John H. Ohler, HS 1950-1951
John A. Ordway, HS 1951-1952
James M. Perry, HS 1975-1979
John B. Petter, HS 1946-1950
Donald L. Posthumus, HS 1968-1969
Herbert F. Reilly, Jr., HS 1964-1967
James W. Robinson, DMS '43, HS 1949-1950
James W. Russell, HS 1952-1954
John R. Sibley, HS 1953-1959, 1964-1966
George A. Simpson, Jr., HS 1951-1952
Carl C. Sohn, HS 1979-1981
Susan S. Spencer, HS 1974-1975
Richard S. Stemler, HS 1955-1957
Lynn C. Stoker, HS 1954-1959
Carlton E. Swett, Jr., HS 1959-1963
Walter P. Sy, HS 1962-1963
Eugene V. Tanski, MD, HS 1967-1971
Seymour E. Wheelock, HS 1944-1945
Robert D. Wiley, DMS '45, HS 1947-1949
Willard Woodrow “Bill” Wilson, DMS '42, HS 1956-1958


Frank J. Lepreau, Jr.
HS 1938-1940

Frank J. Lepreau, Jr., died at the age of 99 on January 25, 2012. The retired surgeon, teacher, and dedicated humanitarian would have celebrated his 100th birthday on October 6, 2012. Family, friends, and colleagues remember Dr. Lepreau as exemplifying the Quaker proverb, “Let your life speak.”

As an undergraduate at Dartmouth College (’34), Lepreau contracted pneumonia. Daily visits and the empathy of his doctor influenced his decision to pursue medicine as a career. After graduating from Dartmouth with a BA in chemistry, he earned his medical degree from Harvard in 1938. He returned to Hanover to intern at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital—in pathology during his first year and as a rotating intern for his second year. During his time at MHMH he met and married his wife, Miriam (Monny), who worked in the pathology lab. Following his internship, he completed a residency in surgery at Yale-New Haven Hospital.

In 1948, Dr. Lepreau established a practice in general and thoracic surgery at Truesdale Clinic and Hospital in Fall River, Mass. He was known as someone who gladly made house calls and was always available to colleagues, nurses, and patients and their families.

Although successful in his practice, Dr. Lepreau was strongly influenced by the work of Dr. Albert Schweitzer and wanted to serve outside the country. In 1964, he visited the Hôpital Albert Schweitzer, founded by Dr. Larimer Mellon in Deschapelles, Haiti, and decided to move there with his family. When he arrived, he was one of three surgeons and subsequently became surgeon-in-chief and medical director. Dr. Lepreau thoroughly enjoyed his time in Haiti – the surgery was challenging and exciting, he interacted with colleagues from around the world, and mentored young physicians. A tribute to Dr. Lepreau appears on the Hôpital Albert Schweitzer website here.

Dr. Lepreau returned to the United States in 1973. Following two years in Kentucky, he moved back to Massachusetts and joined the Westport Family Medicine Center, where he resumed his surgical practice. In 1977, he co-founded and was medical director of Stanley Street Treatment and Resources in Fall River, Mass., a facility for treating alcohol dependency. Today, known simply as SSTAR, the facility is an international model for the treatment of chemical dependency and HIV/AIDS. From 1994 to 2002, he was the medical director of the Rose Hawthorne Lathrop Home for Hospice Care, also in Fall River.

Throughout his entire career, Dr. Lepreau was revered as a teacher and mentor whose former students and colleagues continued to seek him out for advice and counsel. In 1977, he was appointed assistant clinical professor of surgery and of community health at Brown University School of Medicine in Providence, R.I.

Dr. Lepreau is survived by three daughters – Lucy Ann, Judy, and Mimi; eight grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife of 54 years, Miriam (Monny), in 1994; his daughter, Sue, in 1993; son Jay in 2008; and a granddaughter in 1985.

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Seymour E. Wheelock
HS 1944-1945

Dr. Seymour “Sey” Wheelock, a pediatrician who pioneered the adolescent medicine department at Children’s Hospital Colorado, died on December 26, 2012, in Taos, New Mexico. He was 94.

Dr. Wheelock, a native of Denver, earned his bachelor’s degree in 1940 from Dartmouth College, which was founded by his ancestor, Eleazar Wheelock, in 1769. He earned an MD from Northwestern University in 1944 and then returned to Dartmouth to complete his internship and a fellowship in pediatrics at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. He served residencies in pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Children’s Hospital Colorado, formerly Children’s Hospital, Denver.

In 1954, Dr. Wheelock entered the U.S. Army and worked as assistant chief of pediatrics at Walter Reed Army Hospital. Following his discharge, he returned to Denver and his work at Children’s Hospital. In 1962, he came back to Hanover as a member of the Hitchcock Clinic pediatrics staff and an assistant professor of pediatrics at Dartmouth Medical School. In 1966, he was named director of ambulatory pediatrics and director of adolescent pediatric medicine at Children’s Denver, where he remained until 1984, when he retired as chairman emeritus of ambulatory pediatric medicine. While at Children’s Denver, he helped start the first adolescent inpatient facility west of Chicago. He also participated in one of the country’s first child-abuse identification, prevention, and treatment programs—formed at Children’s under the direction of Dr. C. Henry Kempe, whose groundbreaking work led to the recognition of child abuse by the medical community. Dr. Wheelock was also a clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

Throughout his career, Dr. Wheelock was known as a valued mentor, as well as a talented artist and historian. He wrote about the history and origins of medical practice and especially loved writing for Dartmouth Medicine magazine. His article in the Spring 2006 edition, “Wild Greens,” included his detailed botanical illustrations.

Dr. Wheelock was a member of the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics-Colorado Chapter, and the Ambulatory Pediatrics Association. The Wheelock Award, given annually to a member of the Dartmouth Alumni Association of the Rocky Mountains (DARM) for distinguished contributions to the club, is named for Dr. Wheelock, who was its first recipient. He also wrote a monograph detailing the history of the club’s first 100 years.

Dr. Wheelock is survived by his wife of 70 years, Janet Felton Wheelock; a daughter, Martha Brainard; a son, Seymour E. Wheelock III; and two grandsons, Tom Brainard and Whitney Wheelock.

Below is a listing of Dr. Wheelock’s articles that appeared in Dartmouth Medicine, with links when available.

“The Prophet, the Physicians and the Medical School” (Spring 1984)

“A First-Rate Tale” (Fall 1990)

When the Green Wore Blue” (Spring 1993)

President Wheelock and the Smallpox Caper” (Fall 2002)

Wild Greens” (Spring 2006)

Wild Greens: Botanicals as Medicaments” (published online in 2006)

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Jane B. Cadbury
HS 1946-1947

Jane B. Cadbury died at the age of 94 on July 7, 2012, in Framingham, Massachusetts.

Dr. Cadbury was born in Canton, China, where her father, also a physician, was a medical missionary. She spent her childhood in China and returned to the United States at the age of 17 to attend boarding school for a year before entering Wellesley, where she graduated with a degree in chemistry in 1940. When she entered Yale Medical School in the fall of 1940, she was one of three women students. Because of the war, she graduated from Yale in three years, earning her MD in 1943. For the next three years, she trained in pediatrics at several hospitals, including Massachusetts General Hospital, where she was one of the first female residents, and at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital.

Dr. Cadbury began her medical career in 1947 in private practice as a pediatrician in Manchester, New Hampshire. In 1953, she moved with her husband to St. Louis, Missouri, where she transitioned into public health, rising to district officer in the St. Louis County Health Department. She and her family moved to Mankato, Minnesota, in 1968; she then began working in college student health at Mankato State College. The family moved to the Milwaukee area in 1974, where she worked for over 20 years as a physician to students at the University of Wisconsin. She retired in her late seventies, after a career spanning more than 50 years.

Dr. Cadbury was among the first women to balance a career as a physician and raise a family. She is survived by her three children, William Symonds (DC ’73), Ann Symonds, and Robert Symonds; and six grandchildren. Her former husband, Bruce K. Symonds (DC ’45), predeceased her in 2008.

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John B. Petter
HS 1946-1950

John B. “Jack” Petter, a retired thoracic surgeon, died on October 3, 2011. He was 91 years old.

Dr. Petter attended the University of Virginia, earning his undergraduate degree in 1939 and his MD in 1943. He completed a nine-month internship at the University Hospitals of Cleveland before entering the Army during World War II. From 1943 to 1946, he served as a surgeon in the U.S. Army Medical Corps at the 101st General Hospital in England, achieving the rank of captain. After the war, Dr. Petter was a resident in surgery at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital and the Veterans Administration Hospital in White River Junction, Vt.

In 1950, Dr. Petter joined the staff of the VA Hospital in Rutland Heights, Mass., as a thoracic surgeon, becoming chief of surgery in 1953. In 1956, he moved to Worcester, Mass., where he established a private practice and was affiliated with all of the Worcester hospitals throughout his career. He was also an associate professor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Petter was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha and was a member of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the American Thoracic Society, and the American College of Surgeons. He retired in 1984.

Dr. Petter is survived by his wife of 61 years, Elizabeth (Betty); their four daughters, Barbara, Betsy, Ann, and Carolyn; and two grandchildren.

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Robert D. Wiley
DMS '45, HS 1947-1949

Robert (“Bob”) Wiley ’45, a retired obstetrician who had assisted in the delivery of more than 3,700 babies, died on April 29, 2010 at the age of 88.

A graduate of both Dartmouth College and DMS under the Navy V-12 program, Dr. Wiley completed his medical degree at New York University School of Medicine in 1947. He then returned to Hanover for an internship at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, followed by a one-year fellowship in the MHMH Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. His residency at Grace-New Haven Hospital (Yale) was interrupted by two years of service in the U.S. Army’s 43rd Division, stationed in Munich.

Upon completing his residency in 1954, Dr. Wiley accepted a position with the Laconia Clinic in Laconia, NH, where he worked for the next 37 years, twice serving as its president. For much of that time he was a member of the staff of the Lakes Region General Hospital, where he not only served as chief of staff, but also completed a six-year term as trustee. He was a member of the American Medical Association, the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and a former trustee of the American Group Practice Association.

He was predeceased in 1965 by his first wife, Honnor, a nurse anesthetist whom he had met while both were at MHMH. He is survived by his second wife, Cecile; two sons—Christopher Wiley, MD, DC ‘74 (an anesthesiologist at Dartmouth-Hitchcock) and his wife Peggy, and Mark Wiley, DC ’75 and his wife, Janice; two daughters—Suzanne Young, DC ’77 (a director in the Dartmouth College alumni relations office) and her husband Tracy, and Jean Elliott and her husband Joseph; and two stepchildren—Cynthia Baron and Randy Pike. His 16 grandchildren include Benjamin Wiley, DC’10.

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Ralph W. Muckley, Jr., HS 1948-1951

Ralph W. Muckley, Jr., a physician who practiced internal medicine, died at the age of 92 on January 2, 2013, in San Diego, California.

Dr. Muckley, who grew up in Oradell, New Jersey, graduated from Wesleyan University in 1942 before earning an MD from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. After he completed a residency in internal medicine at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, he and his wife, a registered nurse, moved to Covina, California, where he practiced at the Magan Medical Clinic for over 30 years. Upon retiring, they moved to the Rancho Bernardo community in San Diego.

Dr. Muckley is survived by Gladys, his wife of 65 years; their children, Michael, Steve, and Margie; six grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

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Kenneth A. LaTourette
HS 1949-1952

Kenneth Abram LaTourette, a retired pathologist, died at his home in Flat Rock, North Carolina, at the age of 98 on October 14, 2012.

Dr. LaTourette earned his MD from New York University in 1940 and then interned for two years at Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan and Kings County Hospital in Brooklyn. He then completed a two-year rotating residency in medicine at Franklin County Memorial Hospital in Farmington, Maine. In 1942, he enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps and served for four years, first as a flight surgeon in Terceira, Azores, and then as a flight surgeon in charge of the military hospital in Bermuda. After the war, he was discharged as a major.

Following his military service, Dr. LaTourette returned to Maine as a general practitioner for several years. In 1948, he began a four-year residency in pathology at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital that he completed in three years. He taught pathology at Dartmouth Medical School and was on the staff of the VA Hospital in White River Junction, Vermont. In the spring of 1953, he and his family moved to Hendersonville, North Carolina, where he established the department of pathology at the newly opened Margaret R. Pardee Memorial Hospital. He continued to run the department and the laboratory at Pardee until his retirement in 1978. In addition, he served as the staff pathologist at St. Luke’s Hospital in Tryon, North Carolina., and at Mountain Sanitarium, now Park Ridge Hospital, in Fletcher, North Carolina.

Dr. LaTourette was a member of the College of American Pathologists, the American Society for Clinical Pathology, the American Medical Association, and the Southern Medical Association.

Dr. LaTourette is survived by his wife of 72 years, Isabella; daughter Marianne and her husband; one grandson; one granddaughter; and a great-granddaughter.


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James W. Robinson
DMS '43, HS 1949-1950

James W. Robinson, who was born to missionary parents and grew up in China, died at the age of 90 on February 25, 2011.

After graduating from Dartmouth College and Dartmouth Medical School, Dr. Robinson completed his medical degree at Harvard Medical School. He served in the U.S. Navy as a medical officer during WWII and the Korean War. Between the wars, he returned to Hanover and completed his internship in internal medicine at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. He practiced internal medicine and was a partner at the Summit (N.J.) Medical Group, along with classmate Charles (Bud) Clarke, DMS ’43. In addition, he was an attending physician and chief of medicine at Overlook Hospital in Summit. He retired in 1987.

While an undergraduate at Dartmouth, Dr. Robinson was active in the Dartmouth Players and the Jack-O-Lantern, a college humor magazine. After his retirement, he combined his medical background with his interest in theater as a volunteer with the New Jersey Mental Health Players, performing impromptu skits for school groups and others to teach the signs and symptoms surrounding mental health issues.

He is survived by his wife, Rose-Joan Barron; daughters Carol, Lynn, and Jan; six grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren, and two step-children—Alice and Bruce Barron.


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Kenneth E. Cosgrove
HS 1950-1951, 1952-1953

Dr. Kenneth E. Cosgrove, a retired internist specializing in cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, died on November 13, 2009. He was 89 years old.

He graduated from Middlebury College in 1942 and received his MD from New York University in 1946. He then joined the U.S. Navy, interning at the U.S. Naval Hospital in Oakland, Calif., and serving as a physician on the USS Pasadena. Following his Navy service he continued his training in internal medicine at Jersey City Medical Center, at the Hitchcock Clinic, and at Bellevue Hospital in New York City, followed by a fellowship in cardiology at DMS.

In 1953, he moved to Hendersonville, N.C., where he practiced medicine for the next 50 years, playing a key role in shaping health care delivery in the region. In November of that year, he became one of the original physicians at Pardee Hospital in Hendersonville. There, he led the way to many improvements over the years and helped to establish one of the first intensive care units in western North Carolina. In 2003, Dr. Cosgrove’s contributions to the growth and quality of care at Pardee Hospital were recognized by the dedication of the new front entrance lobby in his name.

In 1963 he founded Henderson County Internists. He was also a longtime director of Blue Ridge Community Health Services, which started as a small clinic for migrant workers and has grown to provide pediatrics, primary care, and dental care for families – both insured and uninsured. He was instrumental in establishing Hospice of Henderson County (now called Four Seasons), and served as its medical director from 2003 to 2005. He was a leader in the creation of Carolina Village, a non-profit continuing care retirement community in Hendersonville, and had been a member of its board since 1974. He lived his last four years at the Village.

Dr. Cosgrove helped found Medical Mutual Insurance Agency, the largest medical malpractice insurance company in North Carolina, and was active in the North Carolina Medical Society, serving as its president from 1985 to 1986. He was a fellow of the American College of Physicians, a member of the American Medical Association and of the American Society of Internal Medicine.

Dr. Cosgrove was predeceased by his wife of 56 years, Eleanor, in 2002. He is survived by five sons—Kenneth, Timithy, Barry, Jeffrey, and Christopher; and 16 grandchildren.

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John H. Ohler
HS 1950-1951

John Henry Ohler, a longtime family practitioner and an adjunct faculty member at Dartmouth Medical School, died on December 8, 2011, at the age of 88.

Dr. Ohler, a graduate of Williams College and Harvard Medical School, completed his training at Boston City Hospital and Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. He served briefly in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War II, and following his residency at MHMH, he was assigned to active duty in Korea, where he was a battalion surgeon. He achieved the rank of captain and was awarded a Bronze Star for his service on the front lines.

In 1953, Dr. Ohler and his wife moved to New London, N.H., where he established his medical practice. He was affiliated with New London Hospital until his retirement in 1988 and was instrumental in the growth of the hospital. He also served as the school physician for Colby-Sawyer College in New London and for Proctor Academy, a college preparatory school in nearby Andover. After his retirement, he served on the admissions committee at Dartmouth Medical School. To his patients and colleagues, he was affectionately known as “Dr. John.”

Dr. Ohler is survived by his wife of 65 years, Priscilla White Ohler; their children Deborah, Susan, Jennifer, Jonathan, Peter, and Rebecca; eight grandchildren; and one great-grandson.

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Kent W. Christoferson
HS 1951

Kent W. Christoferson, a retired ophthalmologist, died on October 5, 2011, at the age of 84.

Upon graduating from high school, Dr. Christoferson enlisted in the V-12 Navy College Training Program, serving until 1945. He attended the University of Minnesota, where he earned a BA degree in 1947 and an MD in 1951. After completing an internship at MHMH in 1951, he was recalled as a navel reservist to active duty in Korea, where he served as chief medical officer on transport ships until 1953. He then completed his residency in ophthalmology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, N.Y., and earned an MS in ophthalmology at University of Minnesota. He opened a solo private practice in Eugene, Ore., where he practiced as an ophthalmologist until he retired in 1990. He was also affiliated with Sacred Heart General Hospital in Eugene.

Dr. Christoferson is survived by his two sons, Carl and Bill; three daughters, Julia, Jane, and Maren; seven grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

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John A. Ordway
HS 1951-1952

John A. Ordway II, a retired psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, died on November 12, 2011, in Old Orchard Beach, Maine, at the age of 91.

While a student at Harvard in 1942, Dr. Ordway enlisted in the United States Navy and served as a cryptanalyst in the Pacific Theater during World War II; he was honorably discharged as a second lieutenant.  During this time, he received his BA War Diploma from Harvard in 1943 as a member of the class of 1942. He entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University in 1947 and graduated in 1951. He then served an internship at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, followed by a residency in psychiatry at Cincinnati General Hospital and the Veteran’s Administration Hospital, where he was chief resident from 1954 to 1955. Dr. Ordway began a private practice in Cincinnati in 1955 and subsequently studied at the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis, earning his certification in 1966. He was founding director of the Municipal Court Psychiatric Clinic in Cincinnati and served as the city’s director of mental health and assistant health commissioner.

In 1970, Dr. Ordway and his family moved to Bangor, Maine, where he founded the psychiatric unit at Eastern Maine Medical Center, serving as chief of psychiatry from 1973 to 1980. He also continued his private practices in psychiatry and psychoanalysis until his retirement in 1997. He was a fellow of the American College of Psychiatrists, a Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, and an active member of numerous professional organizations. He contributed chapters to books and published articles on mental health throughout his career.

Dr. Ordway is survived by his wife, Janet E. Ordway, M.D., a fellow medical student whom he married in 1950; their five children, John, Wendy, Sarah, Abi, and Susan; and six grandchildren.

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George A. Simpson, Jr.
HS 1951-1952

George A. Simpson, Jr., who practiced industrial and occupational medicine as well as forensic medicine, died on February 15, 2011 at the age of 92.

During college and medical school, he worked at various industrial and physical labor positions, including operating his own moving and trucking business and piloting a 26-passenger tour launch on Lake Champlain. Following his graduation from Dartmouth College in 1942, Dr. Simpson enlisted in the U.S. Navy, where he served as a lieutenant in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He then enrolled in Cornell Medical College, where he received his MD in 1951. From 1951 to 1952, he trained in internal medicine at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital.

In addition to running his own practice, Dr. Simpson served as a Buncombe County (N.C.) medical examiner. He also taught courses for health and life insurance company employees in anatomy, physiology, pathology, trauma and rehabilitation, and a technique for the evaluation of expected mortality and morbidity.

Dr. Simpson is survived by his daughters, Nelly Christina (Chris) and Ann-Catherine (Annie); and three grandchildren. He was predeceased by his son, Peter.

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Robert C. Joy
DMS '49, HS 1951-1953

Robert C. (Bob) Joy, a pediatrician beloved by generations of children and their families in the Danbury, Ct., area and an advocate for children, died on November 5, 2009 at the age of 86.

Joy entered Dartmouth College with the Class of 1945, but his undergraduate education was interrupted by World War 11, and he left in the spring of his sophomore year to serve in the U.S. Army. He returned to Hanover in the fall of 1945, and finished his undergraduate degree in 1948 and his DMS diploma a year later. After completing his MD at McGill University, Dr. Joy returned to Hanover for an internship and a year of pediatric residency at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. He completed a second year of pediatric residency at Children’s Hospital, Louisville, Ky.

In 1954, he and his wife, Nancy, moved to Danbury, Ct., where he established a general pediatrics practice and joined the staff of Danbury Hospital. Over the course of almost 40 years there, he would go on to serve as director of newborn services, senior attending pediatrician and chair of the hospital’s Child Advocate Committee. He was a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

During his early years in Danbury, Dr. Joy pursued further training in the area of pediatric cardiology at Yale-New Haven Hospital. In 1973-74, he took additional training in neonatology at Yale-New Haven’s Newborn Special Care Unit, Yale-New Haven Hospital. He became the first neonatologist at Danbury Hospital and established the neonatology department there. In the late 1970’s, Dr. Joy undertook a fellowship in developmental pediatrics at the Grover Powers Clinic for children with developmental disabilities at Yale University’s Child Study  Center and began working part-time in the state-funded Danbury Child Development Clinic.

Following his retirement from practice in 1993, he remained active in the arena of child advocacy. With his wife, Nancy, he was a founding member of the Families Network of Western Connecticut (previously Healthy Families Network). He served on the boards of the Danbury Regional Child Advocacy Center and the Danbury Regional Commission on Child Care, Rights and Abuse. In 2003, Dr. Joy received an official citation from the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut for his “five decades of outstanding service and advocacy on behalf of Connecticut’s children.”

He was predeceased by his wife, Nancy in May of 2009. He is survived by his son, Christopher and daughter in law Cathy Velenchik Joy; his daughter Kathleen Cotton and son-in-law Fred Cotton; his daughter Susan Martin-Joy, and three grandchildren.

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James W. Russell
HS 1952-1954

James “Jim” Winslow Russell, a retired family physician and one of the first physicians to be certified as an addiction specialist, died in Boulder, Colo., on April 21, 2012, at the age of 85. A self-described “kindly country doctor,”  he practiced family medicine and made house calls in St. Johnsbury, Vt., until he retired in 1992.

Dr. Russell was a 1947 graduate of Princeton University, where he majored in English. He earned his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1951, where he was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha, and did a residency in internal medicine at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. From 1954 to 1956, he served as a captain in the United States Air Force in Oklahoma. In 1956, he was senior resident at the VA Hospital in White River Junction, Vt., and became assistant chief of medicine there in 1958. In addition to his private practice, Dr. Russell helped to establish an intensive care unit and a drug and alcohol detox and rehab facility at Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital in St. Johnsbury. As reported in Yankee magazine, he was the first physician to conduct a DUI examination on a snowmobiler.

Dr. Russell was a fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. In 1992, Sen. Jim Jeffords read a tribute to him into the Congressional Record to honor his dedicated service to the citizens of Vermont. After retiring to Arizona, he practiced addiction treatment at an Arizona hospital and was named Catalina Citizen of the Year in 2001. Dr. Russell and his wife moved to Boulder, Colo., in 2002; he willed his body to the University of Colorado Medical School.

Dr. Russell is survived by his wife of 27 years, Marilyn; six children, Mercy, Martha, Edie, Ames, Mary, and Robert; three step-children, Dina, Paul, and Peter; nine grandchildren; and a brother, W. Henry Russell, M.D.

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Roger E. Anderson
HS 1953

Roger Eugene Anderson, a retired diagnostic radiologist, died at the age of 86 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on December 3, 2012.

A life-long resident of Minneapolis, Dr. Anderson earned an MD from the University of Minnesota, followed by training at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. Before returning to Minneapolis to practice medicine, he joined the US Navy, where he served as a doctor at Great Lakes Naval Air Station in Illinois. Throughout his career, Dr. Anderson was a partner at Consulting Radiologists in Minneapolis and a staff physician at Deaconess Hospital and Abbott Northwestern Hospital. He also provided services to hospitals in Albert Lea and Austin, Minnesota.

Dr. Anderson is survived by three nephews and numerous cousins.

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Owen P. Lamerson
HS 1953-1957

Owen P. Lamerson, a retired general practitioner, died on February 25, 2011, on Long Island, New York, at the age of 87.

Dr. Lamerson left Fordham University to enlist in the Army during World War II and rose to the rank of second lieutenant in the 5th Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. After the war, he returned to Fordham and graduated in 1948. He earned his MD from SUNY Downstate Medical School in 1952 and completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital and the VA Hospital in White River Junction, Vermont.

Dr. Lamerson was a partner at the Huntington Medical Group for 35 years, president of the staff at Huntington Hospital in 1978 and 1979, and chief of medicine from 1986 to 1990. He was a fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Medical Association, the New York Medical Society, and the Suffolk County Medical Society.

Dr. Lamerson is survived by his wife of 58 years, Patricia; five of his six children, Peter, Patrick, Matthew, Susan, and Meaghan; and 13 grandchildren. His son Paul predeceased him in 1991.

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John R. Sibley

John Rawson Sibley, who devoted much of his life to teaching and leading efforts to develop community-based health care in some of the world’s most underserved regions, died at his home in Etna, New Hampshire, on June 24, 2012, at the age of 85.

Dr. Sibley’s undergraduate studies, which began at Amherst in 1943, were interrupted by his service in the U.S. Army occupation of Japan at the end of World War II. After his military service, he completed his bachelor’s degree at Northwestern University and earned his MD from Northwestern University School of Medicine in 1953. He then served an internship at Wesley Memorial Hospital, an affiliate of Northwestern. During the following six years, he completed a residency in general surgery and pathology at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital (MHMH).  During that time, Dr. William Mosenthal was in the midst of establishing the first intensive care unit in the United States at MHMH, and Dr. Sibley produced a series of humorous sketches in support of Dr. Mosenthal’s idea, illustrating the chaos that often ensued when critically ill patients were admitted to the hospital. Dr. Mosenthal included some of Dr. Sibley’s sketches in presentations he gave around the country.

In 1959, Dr. Sibley began working in missionary medicine with the Presbyterian Church USA. He moved with his wife and four young children to Korea, where he served as a general surgeon at the 300-bed Presbyterian Hospital in Taegu, instructing interns and residents. He also performed facial surgeries at the 1000-patient attached leprosarium. Recognizing the need for a comprehensive community-based health care system, Dr. Sibley and his family moved to Koje Island in 1969, where he became the founding director of what’s thought to be the first community health project in Korea. In doing so, he influenced the Korean government and medical community to shift its emphasis from an expensive and more urban hospital-based system to a broader-based, comprehensive care system serving rural communities. In June of 1977, he concluded his work on the project, and after turning it over to the Koreans, he was awarded the prestigious Order of Civil Merit, Mogryeon Medal, from the Office of the President, Republic of Korea.

Returning to the United States, Dr. Sibley attended the Harvard School of Public Health and earned his M.P.H. in 1979. At the end of 1979, he traveled to Thailand, where he served for four months as medical director of Ban Vinai Refugee Camp in Loei Province. He then returned to Korea for several years, where he was an associate professor of preventive medicine at Yonsei University Medical College in Seoul and a consultant in community health to the Korean Ministry of Health and Social Affairs. From 1983 to 1986, he was associated with the United Mission to Nepal, where he taught basic surgery to rural paramedical workers. He served as assistant health services secretary to the United Mission to Nepal from 1985 to 1986.

Dr. Sibley and his wife returned to the Upper Valley in 1987, where he worked in the Department of Cardiology at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and was an assistant professor of community and family medicine at Dartmouth Medical School until he retired in 1993.

Dr. Sibley undertook his last volunteer overseas mission in 1998, as a member of the Church World Service for Hurricane Relief in Honduras.

Dr. Sibley is survived by Jean, his wife of 64 years; their four children, Don, Annie, Norman “Taz,” and Margaret “Meg”; seven grandchildren; his sister, Elizabeth; and brother, Donald. He arranged to have his body donated to scientific research and education, especially for the study of primary progressive aphasia, a rare speech disorder that afflicted him in the final years of his life.

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George E. Crickard, Jr.
HS 1954-1957

George E. Crickard, Jr., died on September 3, 2010. A retired radiologist, he was 83.

Dr. Crickard was a graduate of Clark University in Worcester, Mass., and earned his MD from Boston University Medical School in 1953. While in medical school he spent a summer volunteering at Hahnemann Hospital in Worcester, Mass., where he met Lois Stevenson, a student nurse. They were married in 1953.

Following a rotating internship at Worcester City Hospital, Dr. Crickard did his residency in radiology at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. He was also a visitor in radiology at the Mayo Clinic. Upon completing his training, he was appointed assistant radiologist at Grace-New Haven Hospital in New Haven, Conn., and an instructor at Yale Medical School. Soon afterwards, he accepted a position as assistant radiologist at Springfield (Mass.) Hospital.

In 1959, Dr, Crickard and his family moved to Quincy, Ill., where he started the Blessing School of X-ray Technology. In 1961 he became chief of radiology at Blessing Hospital in Quincy, a position that he held until his retirement in 1990. He was appointed a clinical instructor of radiology at Southern Illinois School of Medicine in 1979. Dr. Crickard was a member of the American Medical Association, the American College of Radiology, and the Radiological Society of North America.

Dr. Crickard is survived by his wife, Lois; his daughter, Sharon Rose Troup, and her husband, Michael; his son, Dr. George E. Crickard III, and his wife, Maureen; and six grandchildren: Michael Troup, Jr., Blaine Troup, Jensen Troup, George E. Crickard IV, Grace Crickard, and Jack Crickard. He was predeceased by an infant daughter, Lis Ann.

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Lynn C. Stoker
HS 1954-1959

Dr. Lynn “Lindy” Stoker, a retired surgeon, died on March 4, 2012, at the age of 84.

After graduating from high school in 1945, Dr. Stoker enlisted in the U.S. Coast Guard and served on a patrol frigate in the Pacific Theater at the end of World War II. Following the war, he earned his undergraduate degree at Syracuse University in 1949 and his M.D. from Yale University School of Medicine in 1953. He then entered the Army Medical Corps and interned at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in 1954. From 1954 to 1959, Dr. Stoker was a surgical resident at both Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital and at the VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vt., serving as chief resident during his final year. While a research fellow at the VA Medical Center, he was named acting assistant chief of surgery at the hospital, a post that he held from 1960 to 1962.

In 1962, Dr. Stoker decided to pursue his desire to work in a traditional community-based medical practice and moved his family to Albert Lea, Minn. He practiced general surgery at Albert Lea Clinic and Naeve Hospital until his retirement in 1989. He was a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and past president of the Minnesota chapter. He was also a member of the American and Minnesota Medical Associations, the Minnesota Surgical Society, and the Freeborn County Medical Society.

Dr. Stoker is survived by his wife of 61 years, Betty Anderson Stoker; three daughters – Valerie, Christine, and Laura; his son, Robert; five grandchildren; and three sisters.

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Richard S. Stemler
HS 1955-1957

Richard S. Stemler, a retired internist and gastroenterologist, died on August 13, 2009, at the age of 82.

Dr. Stemler received a bachelor’s degree from Lehigh University in 1944, then served two years in the U.S. Navy. He received his MD from the University of Pennsylvania in 1953. Early in his career he worked at Geisinger Memorial Hospital in Danville, Pa., before moving to the Seattle, Wash., area in the mid-1960s, where he worked at the Mason Clinic. He retired in 1992.

No further information is available at this time.

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Richard A. McManus
HS 1956-1957

Richard (“Dick”) McManus, a radiologist, died at the age of 81 on August 18, 2009.

A graduate of Princeton University (1949) and New York Medical College (1954), he completed his radiological residency at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. He also did military service as a captain in the Air Force in Bangor, Maine.

In 1959, he joined North Shore Radiological Associates, practicing primarily at Hunt Memorial Hospital in Danvers, Mass. At Hunt Memorial, he was chief of radiology from 1965 until he retired in 1993, served as president of the Hunt medical staff from 1970 to 1973, and chief of staff from 1978 to 1984. Dr. McManus was instrumental in bringing innovative new services to Hunt, including nuclear medicine in 1969, ultrasound in 1975, and Computed Axial Tomography (CAT) in 1978. In 1984 he was named a Fellow of the American College of Radiology.

Dr. McManus was predeceased by his wife, Kathleen, and a son-in-law, Andrew East. He is survived by his daughters Kathleen East, Deborah French and her husband William French, Mary Reinhardt and her husband Kevin Reinhardt, Deirdre McManus and her husband Steven Balk; his son Richard McManus Jr.; and 12 grandchildren.

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Willard Woodrow “Bill” Wilson
DMS '42, HS 1956-1958

Dr. Willard “Bill” Wilson, an anesthesiologist known as “Dr. Bill” to his patients, died on July 3, 2010, at the age of 92.

A native of New Brunswick, Canada, Dr. Wilson came to the United States as a young teenager at the invitation of Harry R. Wellman, DC 1907, a professor at the Tuck School of Business. Dr. Wilson grew up along the Miramichi River in New Brunswick and met Mr. Wellman during the professor’s annual fishing trips to the river. As Dr. Wilson would later tell it, Mr. Wellman took a shine to him, realizing that he had the potential to benefit from higher education. Dr. Wilson lived in Mr. Wellman’s home in Hanover, doing yard work and other household chores, while he attended Hanover High School. He went on to Dartmouth College, graduating in 1941. Following Dartmouth Medical School, he returned to Canada and earned his MD in 1943 from McGill University in Montreal.

While at McGill, Dr. Wilson was inducted into the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps, where he served until 1946, reaching the rank of Captain. His service in the army coincided with his rotating internship at Montreal General Hospital (1943-44) and the first two years of his residency in neurosurgery at University Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta, which he completed in 1947. He then started a solo general practice in the small town of Brighton, Ontario, eventually forming a partnership and establishing a clinic with another physician there.

After 10 years of private practice, Dr. Wilson decided to specialize and returned to Hanover in 1956 to train at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, where he completed a residency in anesthesiology in 1958. Returning to Canada, he joined the department of anesthesiology at North York Branson Hospital in Ontario. He served as chief of anesthesiology for 15 years and chief of staff and member of the board of governors for three years. He retired in 1984.

Dr. Wilson was predeceased by his wife of 56 years, Dorothy, in 2000. He is survived by his son Willard (Bill); his daughters Nancy, Nora, and Paula; and five grandchildren.

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Virginia Moister
HS 1956-1960

Virginia B. Moister, a retired internist, died on August 22, 2010 at the age of 92.

Dr. Moister received her MD from Harvard Medical School 1956 and went on to complete her internship and residency in internal medicine at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. She practiced at MHMH throughout the 1960s and 70s, with a particular interest in pulmonary medicine

Dr. Moister was a lifelong athlete—from alpine skiing as a child with her family at the Lake Placid Club to wind-surfing well into her seventies. In the 1970s she became interested in the emerging field of sports medicine and took many courses in this field. She retired in 1983 and continued her interest in medicine through course work at Harvard and giving ElderHostel lectures.

She was predeceased in 1991 by her husband, Dr. F. Corbin Moister, DMS ’38, an assistant professor of clinical medicine emeritus at DMS. She is survived by her stepson, Corb Moister, Jr.

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Armand L. Bonvouloir, Jr.
HS 1956-1961

Armand L. Bonvouloir, Jr., affectionately known as “Dr. B” to his patients, died on August 1, 2010. He was 83 years old. Dr. Bonvouloir spent nearly 30 years as a family physician and surgeon in Vermont’s rural Northeast Kingdom.

A native of northwestern Massachusetts, Dr. Bonvouloir attended medical school at the University of Montreal. Following a year of internship with the Navy in Newport, R.I., and another year in hospitals in Montreal, he trained in surgery at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. In 1961, he joined the Orleans Medical Clinic in Orleans, Vt., as one of just two physicians there and became affiliated with North Country Memorial Hospital in Newport, Vt.

The Orleans Medical Clinic, now known as Orleans Family Medicine, proved a perfect fit for Dr. Bonvouloir’s unwavering devotion to caring for the people of his community. The practice style of the clinic provided an intimate setting where doctors and their patients formed close and comfortable lifelong relationships. To his patients, Dr. B was not only known for his warmth, kindness, compassion, and sense of humor, but also as a gifted physician and surgeon.

During his career, he was a member of the American Board of Surgery, the American Medical Association, the Vermont Medical Society, and the Orleans County Medical Society.

Dr. Bonvouloir is survived by his wife of 56 years, Monique; his daughters Joanne, Celine, and Odette; his sons John, Richard, Jack (Claude), and Paul; his grandchildren; and three sisters.

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Richard L. Field
HS 1959-1960

Richard L. Field, a highly respected diagnostic radiologist, passed away on May 21, 2011 at the age of 80.

After receiving his undergraduate degree from Tufts University in 1952, Dr. Field served in the Navy for three years. He then returned to Tufts, graduating from Tufts University Medical School in 1959. In 1962, following training at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, he established a private practice on Mount Desert Island, Maine. He closed his practice in 1969 and after finishing a residency in radiology, he practiced at Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor and at Mayo Regional Hospital in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine.  He retired in 1984.

Dr. Field’s wife, Ann, died in 2007. He is survived by his four children—Jeffrey, Douglas, Martha, and Sarah—and eight grandchildren.

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Harold H. Hoefle
HS 1959-1961

Dr. Harold H. Hoefle, Jr., a retired family practitioner and internist, died at the age of 83 on March 14, 2012.

Dr. Hoefle earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern California in 1951 and his M.D. from McGill University in 1955. Following an internship at California Pacific Hospital, he enlisted in the U.S. Air Force and served at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama. He completed a medical residency at MHMH in 1961. Dr. Hoefle then moved to Portsmouth, N.H., where he started a solo practice. He was also affiliated with Portsmouth Regional Hospital and was the first medical doctor to be elected to the board of trustees.

In 1978, Dr. Hoefle re-joined the Air Force as a major and flight surgeon. Over the next ten years, he was stationed in Texas, Holland, Germany, Delaware, and finally Portsmouth, N.H., at Pease Air Force Base. He retired in 1994 as a colonel. He was a football team doctor in the Air Force, volunteered as team doctor for the Portsmouth High School football team, and was a volunteer for the American Heart Association.

Dr. Hoefle is survived by his wife of 56 years, Marjorie; his sons, Daniel, John, and Iain; and nine grandchildren.

 

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Allen R. Koenig
HS 1959-1961

Dr. Allen R. Koenig, a retired anesthesiologist and critical care physician, died on November 29, 2011, at the age of 82.

Dr. Koenig attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, earning a bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1951, a BS degree in medicine in 1955, and an MD in 1958. He interned at Greenwich Hospital in Connecticut and completed his residency at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, where he was chief resident in anesthesiology. Dr. Koenig was a decorated veteran, serving in the Korean conflict from 1951 to 1952 as a first lieutenant in the Strategic Air Command of the U.S. Air Force.

Dr. Koenig returned to Greenwich Hospital in 1961, where he was a senior attending anesthesiologist and critical care physician until 1976. He was then appointed associate medical director at Pfizer Pharmaceuticals and went on to become director of professional services at Ayerst Laboratories and then advisor of medical affairs in the law department of American Home Products in New York City. Dr. Koenig was a member of numerous professional organizations, a delegate to the Connecticut State Medical Society, and a member of the Fairfield County Malpractice Review Board. He retired in 1990.

Dr. Koenig is survived by his daughters Lora, Kathryn, and Allison; his son Robert; and eight grandchildren. His wife of 55 years, Lora, predeceased him in October, 2011.

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Carlton E. Swett, Jr.,
HS 1959-1963

Carlton E. Swett, Jr., a retired general surgeon, died on January 14, 2012. He was 82.

Dr. Swett, who was born in Wilton, Maine, graduated from Bowdoin College in 1950, where he majored in pre-med. He received an MD from George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in 1954, followed by an internship in Wilmington, Delaware. From 1954 to 1959, he served as senior surgeon at the Juvenile Federal Prison in Littleton, Colorado, with the US Public Health Service and Federal Bureau of Prisons, before completing a surgical residency at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital.

Following his residency, Dr. Swett moved to Skowhegan, Maine, to begin his private practice as a general surgeon in a setting where he could get to know his patients on a personal level. From 1963 until his retirement in 1990, Dr. Swett ran his practice and served on the medical staff of Redington-Fairview General Hospital, where he was medical director from 1975 to 1990. He was a member of the Board of Directors for both Fairview Hospital and Redington-Fairview General Hospital from 1964 to 1990.

Dr. Swett was a member of the American College of Surgeons and their liaison officer for the cancer program and tumor registry at Redington-Fairview. He was also active with the New England Cancer Society and the Maine Medical Association, where he was chairman of the ethics committee.

Dr. Swett Is survived by his wife of ten years, Kathy; son Jeffrey; grandson Joshua; his brother, Keene; two stepsons; one stepdaughter; and four step-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his daughter, Susan Jean Swett; wife Beryl; and wife Joyce.

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Gerald E. Bowen
HS 1960-1963

Dr. Gerald E. Bowen, a dedicated and highly respected practitioner of internal medicine and gastroenterology, died at the age of 78 on May 6, 2011.

A New Hampshire native, Dr. Bowen graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of New Hampshire in 1954 and received his medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine in 1959, where he was a member of Alpha Omega Alpha. Upon receiving his MD, he joined the U.S. Naval Reserve as a lieutenant in the Medical Corps, completing his internship at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. He was then stationed at the U.S. Naval Hospital in Portsmouth, N.H., for two years. He completed his residency at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital and the VA Hospital in White River Junction, Vt., in 1963. A fellowship in gastroenterology at the University of Chicago followed.

A resident of Shrewsbury, Mass., Dr. Bowen was the ninth physician to join the medical staff at the Fallon Clinic and became the first gastroenterologist at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Worcester. In 1974 he was elected a Fellow of the American College of Physicians. He retired from practicing medicine in 1995, but continued to attend lectures and rounds at St. Vincent’s Hospital and UMass Medical School.

He is survived by Norma, his wife of 54 years; his son, David; his daughter, Joan; and five grandchildren.

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Dennis J. Carlson
HS 1960-1964

Dennis J. Carlson died at his home in Swanzey, New Hampshire, on September 28, 2012, at the age of 79. He was a retired pathologist who had been an assistant professor of pathology at Dartmouth Medical School (now the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth).

Dr. Carlson earned a BS in chemistry from the College of Wooster in 1955 and an MD from Case Western Reserve University in 1959. Following a rotating internship at University Hospitals of Cleveland, he completed a residency in pathology at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital in 1964. From 1964 to 1966, he served in the U.S. Air Force at Wright Paterson Air Force Base. He then began his medical career, as the northeast regional commissioner for the Clinical Laboratory Inspection and Accreditation Program of the College of American Pathologists.

Dr. Carlson was board certified in anatomic and clinical pathology, nuclear medicine, and forensic medicine. In 1981, he co-founded Seacoast Pathology in Exeter, New Hampshire, and while there practiced at Exeter Hospital and at hospitals in Newburyport and Amesbury, Massachusetts. He also served as the medical examiner across most of southern New Hampshire for several years. He later practiced in Keene, New Hampshire, and at DHMC. He was a member of the College of American Pathologists, the American Society of Clinical Pathologists, the Society of Nuclear Medicine, and the National Association of Medical Examiners. In the mid-70s, he was active in the New Hampshire legislature representing the New Hampshire Medical Society.

Dr. Carlson is survived by Susan, his wife of 58 years; their children Cynthia, John, Heather, Tracy, and Laurie; and five grandchildren.

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Charles B. Carter
HS 1960-1961

Charles “Chuck” Carter, a retired ophthalmologist who practiced in Vancouver, Washington, died on October 2, 2012, at the age of 78.

Dr. Carter received his undergraduate degree from Willamette University before graduating with a medical degree from Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine in 1960. After an internship at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, he completed a four-year residency in ophthalmology at the University of Minnesota Medical Center. He began his practice at Vancouver Eye Care Clinic in 1965 and remained there until retiring in 1995. At the age of 40, Dr. Carter traveled to Haiti to volunteer at a clinic in the mountains, which led to many more medical missions in Haiti, Sierra Leone, and the Czech Republic.

Dr. Carter is survived by his wife of 54 years, Joyce; his daughter, Karen; his sons, Steve and Mark; six grandchildren; and a sister.

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Walter P. Sy
HS 1962-1963

Walter P. Sy, an anesthesiologist, died at the age of 74 on February 17, 2011, at his home in Westmoreland, NH, after a long illness.

Dr. Sy earned his undergraduate degree and MD from the University of Rochester in 1958 and 1962, respectively. He then interned at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital and completed his residency in anesthesiology at Yale-New Haven Hospital in New Haven, Conn.

From 1965 to 1967, Dr. Sy served as chief of anesthesiology at the US Naval Hospital at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in New Hampshire. Upon discharge from the Navy, he joined the staff of Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital as an anesthesiologist and the faculty of Dartmouth Medical School as an instructor in surgery. In 1969, he became director of residency training in anesthesiology and an assistant clinical professor of surgery. He was elected an examiner for the American Board of Anesthesiology in 1972 and held that position for 15 years.

In 1979, he assumed the chairmanship of the Department of Anesthesiology at Cheshire Medical Center in Keene, NH, now affiliated with Dartmouth-Hitchcock, where he worked until he retired in 1998. While there, he founded and directed the pain treatment clinic in the Department of Anesthesiology.

Dr. Sy is survived by his wife of 51 years, Jeanie; daughters, Jennifer Sy Heger and Alice Sy Dolbow; son Christian; and six grandchildren.

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Kenneth N. Carpenter
HS 1964-1965

Kenneth Neff Carpenter died at the age of 73 on October 15, 2012. He practiced family medicine in Dublin, Ohio, for 47 years.

Dr. Carpenter earned his medical degree from Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health in 1964. After completing his training at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, he returned to Ohio to pursue small town family medicine. Dedicated to traditional family medical practice, he was known for making house calls and for his long hospital visits with his patients.

Dr. Carpenter is survived by his wife of 48 years, Patricia; sons Donald, Jack, and Greggory; seven grandchildren; and his brother, Herbert O. Carpenter.

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Herbert F. Reilly, Jr.
HS 1964-1967

Herbert F. (“Bert”) Reilly, Jr., a retired radiologist, died on March 23, 2009.

After earning his MD from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1960, Dr. Reilly interned at Mary Fletcher Hospital (now Fletcher Allen) in Burlington, Vt. and then completed surgical and radiology residencies at the Bassett Hospital in Cooperstown, N.Y. and at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. He also served as a captain and general surgeon in the U.S. Air Force.

Dr. Reilly was an attending radiologist at Ellis Hospital in Schenectady, N.Y., where he was also department chairman from 1980 to 1991. He was an associate staff member at Sunnyview Rehabilitation Hospital in Schenectady and Nathan Littauer Hospital in Gloversville, N.Y. Dr. Reilly was a member of a number of state and national medical societies, including  the American College of Radiology and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

Dr. Reilly is survived by his wife of 50 years, Audrey; his five sons and their wives—Bret and  Nancy, Christopher and Kendall, David and Kristine, Eric and Rachel, and Andrew and Joanne; and 13 grandchildren.

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Robert B. Bokat
HS 1965-1967

Robert (“Bob”) Bokat, a retired pediatrician, died on March 23, 2010, at the age of 74.

Dr. Bokat earned his MD at the University of Maryland Medical School. Following a rotating internship in pediatrics, medicine, surgery, and ob/gyn at the U.S. Public Health Service Hospital in Seattle, he worked with USPHS on the Oglala Sioux reservation in Pine Ridge, S.D., the Navajo reservation in Shiprock, N.M., and the Cherokee reservation in Cherokee, N.C. In 1965, Dr. Bokat came to Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital for his residency in pediatrics.

Dr. Bokat practiced pediatrics in Brunswick, Maine from 1968 to 1973, where he had attending privileges at Maine Medical Center in Portland and was an instructor in clinical pediatrics at Tufts Medical School. He and his family moved to Canton, New York, in 1973, where he had a private pediatrics practice and served as school physician to the local schools and a consultant to the St. Lawrence Mental Health Services. In 1986, the Bokats moved to Hilton Head, South Carolina, where Dr. Bokat continued in private practice until he retired in 2000. In Hilton Head, he also served on the Board of the Children’s Relief Fund. He was a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Betty; his daughters Suzy, Julia, and Tanya; their husbands Scott Stone, John Giordano, and David Hardy; and five grandchildren.

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James C. Dangel
HS 1965-1967

James C. Dangel, a retired cardiologist, died on January 3, 2010, at the age of 70. He had recently retired from a 37-year career at MetroWest Medical Center in Framingham, Mass., and spent his last days in the intensive care unit he helped to establish there, cared for by former colleagues.

He graduated from Princeton University in 1961 and received his MD from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in 1965. He did his residency in internal medicine at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, followed by a residency in cardiology at the University Hospitals in Cleveland and a fellowship at Georgetown University Medical Center. His training was interrupted by two years of military service at the Fort Devens Army Hospital, where he was director of the EEG laboratory and assistant chief of medicine.

In 1973, Dr. Dangel joined Framingham Union Hospital, now part of MetroWest Medical Center, as a cardiologist. During his long career there, he was instrumental in establishing the cardiac catheterization laboratory, the coronary care unit, echocardiography, and exercise testing, and twice served as chief of cardiology. In 1991, he co-founded the Framingham Heart Center and served as president and CEO of the practice, which became the Heart Center of MetroWest in 2002. He was a member of the Cardiovascular Institute of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and was an assistant professor at both Boston University School of Medicine and Tufts University School of Medicine.

Dr. Dangel served the Massachusetts Department of Public Health as a member of the adult invasive cardiac services task force, the invasive cardiac services clinical subcommittee, and the PTCA and satellite cardiac surgery subcommittee. He was a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and of the American Heart Association’s Council on Clinical Cardiology, and he served on the editorial board of the Cardiac Chronicle.

He is survived by his wife, Karen; three sons—Evan, Christopher, and Colin; and seven grandchildren.

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Donald J. Dowler
HS 1965-1967

Donald J. Dowler, a retired internist who practiced at the Quincy Clinic in Quincy, Illinois, died on April 6, 2011, at the age of 74.

Dr. Dowler graduated from Georgetown University and Georgetown University School of Medicine, where he received his M.D. in 1961. He served his internship at Georgetown University Hospital and began his residency at the University of California, San Francisco General Hospital. He completed his residency in internal medicine at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital and the Hitchcock Clinic in 1967. Shortly thereafter, the Dowler family moved to Quincy, where Dr. Dowler practiced as part of the Quincy Medical Group until his retirement in 2006. He was a member of the American Medical Association and Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society.

Dr. Dowler is survived by his wife, Joan, whom he married in 1962; their six children, Gregory, Karen, Diana, Michael, Timothy, and Kristin; ten grandchildren; and his brother, Bruce.

 

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Eugene V. Tanski, MD, HS 1967-1971

Dr. Eugene V. Tanski, a former plastic surgeon turned artist, died on May 20, 2013. He was 77.

Dr. Tanski was one of the first plastic surgeons to establish a freestanding surgical clinic and to integrate photography and video into his practice. He was also a pioneer in cleft palate surgery. As an artist, he was known as much for his photography as for his extraordinary sculptures and woodturnings, which have been in galleries and art shows around the world.

At the time of his death, Dr. Tanski resided and worked in Loveland, Colorado.

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Donald L. Posthumus, HS 1968-1969

Donald L. Posthumus, a retired internist who practiced in the San Francisco South Bay medical community for over 35 years, died on February 15, 2013, at the age of 70.

Dr. Posthumus earned his MD from the University of California, San Francisco in 1968, and then moved east to train at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. He then served briefly in the U.S. Army at Fort Bragg, N.C., before moving on to Walter Reed in Washington, D.C. After concluding his military service, he and his family returned to California and eventually settled in San Jose in 1977. He retired in 2006 to care for his ailing wife, Sherry.

Dr. Posthumus is predeceased by his wife of 40 years, Sherry. He is survived by his daughters, Lisa and Jennifer; three grandchildren; and his companion, Kathie Joos.

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Bryant Barnard, HS 1969

Bryant Barnard, a retired urologist from Wenham, Massachusetts, died on August 17, 2013, at the age of 76.

Dr. Barnard graduated with a bachelor’s degree in biology from Dartmouth College in 1958 and earned an MD from Cornell University Medical College (now Weill Cornell Medical College) in 1962. He completed his medical training in urology and general surgery at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital and at New York Presbyterian Hospitals at Columbia and Cornell. During the Vietnam War, he served as a surgeon in the US Navy aboard the aircraft carrier USS Independence and at the Naval Hospital in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

In 1971, Dr. Barnard opened North Shore Urological Associates in Beverly, Massachusetts, where he practiced until he retired in 1997. He was also on staff at Beverly and Addison Gilbert Hospitals, where he served as chief of surgery and president of the medical staff. Dr. Barnard was a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, president of the Massachusetts Association of Practicing Urologists, and president of the Evelyn Lilly Lutz Foundation, which is connected to Beverly Hospital. In retirement, he remained a trustee of Northeast Health Systems and traveled on surgical missions to Cameroon and Kosovo.

Dr. Barnard is survived by his wife, Doris; sons Robb, Scott, and Timothy; and three grandsons.

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James A. Frizzell, HS 1969-1974

James A. Frizzell, a retired gastroenterologist, lost his battle with cancer on December 15, 2013, at the age of 70. 

Dr. Frizzell graduated from the University of New Hampshire in 1964 and earned his MD at the University of Vermont. He completed his internship at Denver General Hospital and his residency at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. He spent two years in the Army during the Vietnam War (at Walter Reed Hospital), after which he returned to Mary Hitchcock to complete his fellowship in Gastroenterology. 

Dr. Frizzell began his career as a gastroenterologist in Frederick, Md., in 1974, as the first sub-specialist in Frederick. In 1988, he built and opened the Frederick Medical and Surgical Building, which included Frederick Surgical Center, one of the first ambulatory surgical centers in Maryland. He retired from medicine in 2010. 

Beginning in 1997, he and his wife, Janet, had a home in Sanibel, Fla., where they also owned Huxter’s Market, Deli, and Liquors and Sanibel Spirits. 

Dr. Frizzell is survived by his wife, Janet Frizzell; son Justin and daughter-in-law Laurie; and granddaughter Aria. He was predeceased by his son Julian.

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John J. Barrett
HS 1970-1972

John J. Barrett, a retired anesthesiologist, died on December 23, 2011, at the age of 73.

Dr. Barrett earned his undergraduate degree from Yale University in 1961 and an M.D. from Boston University School of Medicine in 1966. From 1966 to 1968, he interned and completed one year of a residency in surgery at Boston City Hospital. His training was interrupted by service in the medical corps of the U.S. Air Force from 1968 to 1970 in Nakhon Phanom, Thailand. Upon returning, Dr. Barrett completed a residency in anesthesiology at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. He began practicing at Charlotte Hungerford Hospital in Torrington, Connecticut, in 1975 and became chair of the anesthesiology department in 1977. Throughout his career, he was employed by Anesthesiology Associates of Torrington. He retired in 1998.

Dr. Barrett was a volunteer with humanitarian and medical relief groups in Haiti and India, and from 2002, he was an active member of the Winsted Area Peace Action group.

Dr. Barrett is survived by his wife of 32 years, Cynthia Martin Barrett; his son, Christopher; two daughters, Elizabeth and Jennifer; three grandchildren; his brother, Frank, and sister, Helen.

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Leo F. Amrhein, Jr.
HS 1974-1975

Leo F. Amrhein, Jr., a psychiatrist, died on March 16, 2011, at the age of 67 after a 26-year battle with Parkinson’s disease.

Dr. Amrhein was a graduate of the College of the Holy Cross and Tufts Medical School, class of 1970. After an internship at Maine Medical Center, he served as a physician in the U.S. Navy for three years, followed by residencies in psychiatry at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and Tufts New England Medical Center in Boston, Mass. After completing his studies, he served as the director of “Discovery,” a psychiatric day treatment facility in Quincy, Mass. He also had a private practice in Hingham, Mass. Dr. Amrhein practiced throughout his illness and as it progressed, serving  as an example to his patients of how to deal with adversity.

He is survived by his long-time partner, Noah M. Yonge; his brother Christopher and sister Mary; an aunt; six nieces; and one nephew.

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Susan S. Spencer
HS 1974-1975

Susan S. Spencer, professor of neurology and neurosurgery at Yale School of Medicine, died from complications of an acute intestinal illness on May 21, 2009. She was 60 years old. Dr. Spencer was an internationally recognized expert in epilepsy and epilepsy surgery and co-director of the Yale Epilepsy program with her husband, Dennis Spencer, MD, chair of neurosurgery.

After earning her MD at the University of Rochester in 1974, Dr. Spencer did an internship in medicine at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, followed by a residency and then fellowship in neurology at Yale Medical School. In 1980 she joined the Yale faculty, becoming a full professor in 1992. During this period she worked with the late Dr. Peter D. Williamson, who went on to become founder and director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, a professor at DMS, and a generous benefactor of DMS with his wife, Susan. In October of 2007, Dr. Spencer was one of dozens of colleagues to participate in a two-day festschrift in honor of Dr. Williamson at Dartmouth-Hitchcock.

Colleagues remember Dr. Spencer as an exemplar of excellence in research, in teaching, and in clinical care. From early in her career, she assumed a leading role in research in the area of epilepsy surgery. Her research earned continuous National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant support, and she authored more than 200 papers and chapters on epilepsy surgery. Dr. Spencer directed an epilepsy fellowship program at Yale, many of whose graduates have gone on to major leadership positions in the field. She also served on the Yale School of Medicine admissions committee for almost 10 years.

Dr. Spencer was a past president of the American Epilepsy Society (AES), past vice president of the American Neurological Society (ANA), and served on the executive boards of both the ANA and the American Academy of Neurology. She co-founded and co-edited the AES’s journal, Epilepsy Currents, from 2001 to 2009. She was the recipient of numerous awards, including the highly prestigious AES Clinical Research Award in 2003.

Dr. Spencer is survived by her husband, Dennis; her daughters Joanna Spencer and Andrea Spencer; stepdaughter Kate Spencer; stepson Christopher Spencer; sisters Beth Weingarth and Karen Kimball; and her mother, Magda Schneider.

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James J. O’Connor
HS 1975-1979

James J. “Jim” O’Connor, an orthopaedic surgeon with a subspecialty in sports medicine, died from cancer on July 15, 2011, at the age of 61.

Dr. O’Connor attended the College of the Holy Cross, graduating with a bachelor of science degree in 1971, and earned his MD from Georgetown University School of Medicine in 1975, where he was a member of Alpha Omega Alpha. He interned at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, followed by residencies in orthopaedic surgery at DHMC and Newington Children’s Hospital in Hartford, Conn. After completing his medical training in 1980, Dr. O’Connor opened a private practice in Marshfield, Wis. In 1984 he began practicing at Midelfort Clinic Orthopedics in Eau Claire, Wis., where he remained until his retirement in 2010.

Dr. O’Connor was a fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and a member of the American Medical Society, Wisconsin State Medical Society, and the Wisconsin Orthopaedic Society.

He is survived by Colleen, his wife of 40 years; three children – Rod, Katie, and Tim; nine grandchildren; his mother, Ann O’Connor; his sister, Elizabeth, and brother, Thomas.

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Steven C. Delheimer, HS 1975-1976

Steven “Steve” Delheimer, a neurological surgeon, died unexpectedly at the age of 64 on September 27, 2013. 

Dr. Delheimer graduated from the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana in 1971 and earned an MD from University of Illinois Rockford School of Medicine in 1975. He served a surgical internship at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital from 1975 to 1976, then completed a neurosurgical residency at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, New York.  Throughout his career, Dr. Delheimer was in private practice in Rockford, LasSalle-Peru, and most recently, Bloomington, Illinois. He was affiliated with Illinois Valley Community Hospital in Peru.

Dr. Delheimer is survived by his son, Matthew, and his daughter, Amanda; three brothers; and a sister. 

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James M. Perry
HS 1975-1979

James M. Perry, HS ’75-79, an orthopaedic surgeon, died on October 30, 2006, at the age of 62.

He graduated from the United States Air Force Academy in 1965 and earned his MD from the University of Florida College of Medicine in 1975. He received his post-graduate training in general and orthopaedic surgery at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and in sports medicine-orthopaedic surgery at Children’s Hospital of Boston, completing his residency in 1980.

He began his career as an orthopaedic surgeon at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pa. In 1993, he became the associate chair of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at the University of Florida Health Science Center in Jacksonville, where he was also an assistant professor. He later practiced at Highland Orthopedics & Sports in Jacksonville, also serving as its president.

Dr. Perry is survived by his wife, Dr. Kathleen Kopach, also an orthopaedic surgeon. They had three children, Elizabeth, Leslie, and Kristin.

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Michael G. Altmann
HS 1978-1982

Michael G. “Mike” Altmann, a highly respected diagnostic radiologist, died at the age of 60 on September 29, 2011. Dr. Altmann, who was still practicing medicine, died suddenly while helping a neighbor clear trees following a storm.

A graduate of Northern Michigan University, where he earned an undergraduate degree in biology, Dr. Altmann received his medical degree from the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine in 1978. He was one of the original members of the Upper Peninsula program which, in conjunction with Marquette General Health Systems, was established to train physicians to practice in rural areas. He completed his internship and residency at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital in 1982.

Dr. Altmann practiced in Eau Claire, Wis., for six years and then was affiliated with Bell Memorial Hospital in Ishpeming, Mich., as well as Marquette General Hospital for many years. Most recently, he provided radiology services to various hospitals throughout the Upper Peninsula through Marquette Radiology Associates, P.C., where he also served as president. Throughout his career, Dr. Altmann was known for his integrity, competence, and compassion and he frequently donated his services to the uninsured of Marquette County.

Dr. Altmann is survived by his wife of 37 years, Susan; his mother, June; and two sisters, Bonnie and Catherine, and their families.

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Dana John Giulian, HS 1978-1979

Neurologist Dana J. Giulian, a professor and dedicated researcher for Baylor College of Medicine, died on May 8, 2010, in Houston, Texas. The recipient of numerous awards, Dr. Giulian, age 59, was a widely published researcher who studied neurotoxins released by microglia.

In 1978, Dr. Giulian received both an MD from Cornell University Medical School and a PhD from The Rockefeller University. He interned at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital from 1978 to 1979. 

At the time of his death, Dr. Giulian was the chief strategy officer at Inflame Therapeutics Inc. in Houston, Tex. Dr. Giulian was a participant in the National Institutes of Health Commercial Assistance Program and focused on the development of biomarkers and drugs for the treatment of brain inflammation as found in Alzheimer's disease and HIV dementia. 

Dr. Giulian was survived by his wife, Elaine Wendt; twin sons, David and William; a brother, Gary; and a sister, Valory.

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Mark J. Iannini
HS 1979-1981

Mark Iannini, a rheumatologist in Tucson, Arizona, died suddenly on March 28, 2012, at the age of 58.

Dr. Iannini, a native of Marlboro, Mass., earned his undergraduate degree with high honors from the College of the Holy Cross and graduated from Georgetown University School of Medicine in 1979, where he was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha. He trained in internal medicine at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital and Beth Israel Hospital (now Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) in Boston. He then entered the fellowship program in rheumatology at Massachusetts General Hospital and received an MIT Physician in Science Grant to conduct research into the immunology of rheumatologic diseases.

Dr. Iannini was an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Virginia School of Medicine before moving to Tucson, where he established a practice in rheumatology. While in practice, Dr. Iannini earned an M.P.H. from the University of Arizona. He was a pioneer in the use of in-office MRI to aid in the early diagnosis and treatment of joint disease and lectured nationally on this topic. He also provided free rheumatologic care to Native Americans on various reservations in Arizona and as part of his M.P.H. program, he spent three months doing research and providing health care in Africa. He was a fellow of the American College of Rheumatology and received a Consumers’ Research Council of America Award for Excellence in 2007.

Dr. Iannini is survived by his two sons, Julian and Luke; his brothers, Jay, Paul, George, and David; and the mother of his sons and former wife, Sylvia Schick Young.

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Carl C. Sohn
HS 1979-1981

Carl C. Sohn, a pathologist at Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, Calif. died on March 22, 2010. He was 64.

No further information is available at this time.

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Lon W. Howard
HS 1982-1984

Lon W. Howard, an orthopaedic surgeon, died on October 27, 2012, at the age of 64. Dr. Howard, who practiced in Littleton, New Hampshire, passed away at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center after a long struggle with a myelodysplastic syndrome.

Immediately after graduating from high school, Dr. Howard enlisted in the U.S. Air Force. He served first in Vietnam and then in Germany, where he found his vocation while working as an orthopaedic technician. He was a member of the Air Force ski team and football team, and he earned a scholarship to play football for the University of Rhode Island. After graduating with a BS in Zoology, he earned an MD from the University of Massachusetts School of Medicine in 1982. He served his internship and one year of residency in general surgery at Dartmouth-Hitchcock before completing a residency in orthopaedics at the University of Louisville, where he was chief resident, in 1988. Dr. Howard and his family then moved to Littleton where he practiced for 24 years at Littleton Orthopedics and Littleton Regional Hospital.

Dr. Howard was a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and a member of the organization’s board of counselors; president of the New Hampshire Medical Society and Grafton County Medical Society; and surgical staff president and a member of the board of trustees at Littleton Regional Hospital.

Dr. Howard is survived by his wife, Kim; their children, Keli, Lon Wesley II “Wes”, and Luke; a granddaughter, Madeleine; his brother, Keith; and sister, Cheryl.

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Frederick Fries
HS 1983-1986

Frederick Fries, a neurologist, died on December 1, 2010, at the age of 62.

Dr. Fries attended medical school at the Université de Liège, Belgium. He served his internship at Trenton Affiliated Hospitals in New Jersey, followed by a residency in neurology at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. He then opened a private practice in the Montpelier, Vermont, area. In addition to general neurology, he had a special interest in nerve entrapment syndromes and research.

He is survived by his wife of 28 years, Christine; six sons—Fairchild, Wolfgang, Thorstan, Richmund, Reynald, and Northcliff.

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Daniel F. Klinar
HS 1985-1987

Daniel G. Klinar, an orthopaedic surgeon in Kingsport, S.C., died on June 6, 2013, at the age of 53. 

Dr. Daniel Klinar was born in Regensburg, Germany, and grew up in Columbia, S.C. After receiving his undergraduate degree from Davidson College, he earned his MD from Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. He trained in surgery at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center from 1985 to 1987 and completed his residency in orthopaedic surgery at Campbell Clinic in Memphis, Tenn. A resident of Kingsport since 1991, Dr. Klinar and practiced at Associated Orthopaedics of Kingsport.

During his career, Dr. Klinar published in the American Journal of Orthopaedics and presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the American Medical Association, and the Tennessee Medical Association meetings. He served as president of the Appalachian Orthopaedic Associates and was president of the Associated Orthopaedics of Kingsport until his death.

Dr. Klinar is survived by his son, William W. Klinar; his parents, Dr. Karl L. and Helen M. Klinar; his siblings, Dr. Karl S. Klinar, Michael R. Klinar, Kathleen M. Klinar, and Jeffrey D. Klinar; and special friend, Dr. Page Mayo.

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Gudbjorn Karlsson
HS 1999-2002

Dr. Gudbjorn “Bjossi” Karlsson, DO, died on February 29, 2012, at the age of 45. Dr. Karlsson, who excelled in downhill skiing, died as the result of a sudden illness while on vacation in Colorado.

After graduating from Bates College with a BS degree in 1989, Dr. Karlsson went on to earn a DO from the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1989. He completed a residency at Eastern Maine Medical Center before beginning a residency in anesthesiology at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. Following his training, Dr. Karlsson returned to  Maine, where he was an attending physician and assistant director in the emergency department at Inland Hospital in Waterville.

Dr. Karlsson was an accomplished and highly regarded medical researcher, publishing papers on neurological and cardiovascular topics in Brain Journal, the American Journal of Physiology, and Neuroscience Research, among others. He also earned an MSc in aquaculture from the University of Bergen in Norway, which included research on the Icelandic grey seal population.

Dr. Karlsson is survived by his wife, Dr. Julia Woods Karlsson (HS 1997-2001); two daughters, Nika and Anya; his parents; two brothers; and two grandfathers, both of whom still live in his family’s native Iceland.

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Brent A. Homoleski
HS 2003-2007

Brent A. Homoleski, a psychiatrist and associate professor at DMS, died on May 14, 2010 after a sudden illness. He was 35 years old.

Dr. Homoleski was a graduate of Tufts University and earned his MD at Chicago Medical School in 2003. He completed a four-year residency at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, during which he served as chief resident in psychiatry. He then went to Catholic Medical Center in Manchester, NH where he was assistant chief of psychiatry. Most recently, Dr. Homoleski was a psychiatrist at New Hampshire Hospital in Concord and an associate professor at DMS. His specialty was pharmacology, and he chaired the pharmacology and teaching committee at New Hampshire Hospital.

He is survived by his wife, Karolina (Radziszewska) Homoleski; his parents, Bruce and Dianna Homoleski; a sister, Beth Ann Homoleski; his grandmother, Irene Martin; and several aunts and uncles. Memorial contributions may be made to the Heart Failure and Cardiomyopathy Awareness Program at Dartmouth-Hitchcock (One Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03756).

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